December 15, 2014

Dispensation 6: A Change of Heart

Posted in Salvation, Terminology, The Church, The Dispensations tagged , , , , , at 11:48 AM by E. M.

Changed_heartThe dispensations are God’s contrastive way of proving that His plan for man is right, by allowing mankind the opportunity to choose to be Godly on their own. In the first three dispensations God allow men fairly free reign during periods of complete innocence, vast knowledge, and full cooperation. Each time mankind chose themselves over God by thinking comparatively. Furthermore, each dispensation resulted in men becoming more evil!

In the 4th and 5th Dispensations, God provided progressive guidance though earthly representatives and by giving them His Law, culminating in the advent of a divine Redeemer. Again men choose themselves over God by rejecting (and ignoring) the guidance.

Since in the previous two dispensations God gave men guidance through external sources, the next just and logical step would be to make that guidance intimate and internal.

The 6th Dispensation asks the question: What if God’s presence was housed inside us, and gave us day by day guidance on how to be like Him? Would we choose God over ourselves?

Its an intriguing proposition, and its one of the many ways that this dispensation is so special and unique. But how would this work? How does God presence get “inside” us (and how much space does He need?)

It all starts with Salvation.

When a person’s “gets saved”, it’s not a one-way proposition. When the decision to accept the gift of redemption is made, God doesn’t just give a wink and a thumbs-up. God begins the work of actively changing your entire life!

Salvation makes us a new creation. We are given a new heart by God, and His Law is written on our hearts. Why our hearts and not our brain/mind? Because the heart is where your integrity comes from.

Like the brain, the physical heart has neural connections that make it function like a “mini-brain”. Your heart has its own independent nervous system consisting of over 30,000 neurons.. Like the unconscious brain, the heart is part of the body that can respond and make decisions based on intuition and feelings.

But its effects on us are more primal and less influenced by the things that can affect our conscious minds. The heart is much more binary. You can fake all kinds of things with your conscious brain, but you can’t fool the heart. Whatever is true about you flows from your heart. That’s why in salvation, God is much more concerned with what you believe in your heart than in your mind.

The problem is that before salvation, man’s heart is evil! It reflects the fact that man is not always and completely right and just. That heart rejects the Godly thought process (contrastive thinking and growth) and embraces destructive thoughts (comparative thinking and comfort). Fortunately man has free will and can choose to act outside of his nature.

Accepting redemption is an act of free will. But even with that acceptance God knows that is would be a losing battle to try to influence through our old heart, and He certainly can’t dwell there – so He gives us a new one!

Of course I’m not speaking of replacing the physical organ (becoming a Christina does not require major surgery), I’m speaking of the spiritual housing of the heart – the part that affects and is affected by our thought process. This new heart can hear from God and can be influenced by God

This is the definition of grace – the Divine influence on the heart and its reflection in life.

The 6th Dispensation is unique in that it is a direct conduit to the meaning of life. How is it connected to the meaning of life? Remember, in order to be with God, we have to be like God. The only “man” who has ever managed to be like God is Jesus during his earthly incarnation. How? He lived by grace! He ONLY did what God told him to do. This is how he was fully man and fully God. The sixth dispensation gives us all that same opportunity!

The Problem is we get all kinds of inner notions and urges influencing us constantly. Sure we get a new heart through salvation, but the rest of us (specifically our minds) are still under Adam’s curse. We are still not always and completely right and just in our nature. So how do you know if it’s God’s influence that we are hearing?

Unsaved man is influenced by three sources, the “World”, the “Flesh”, and the “Devil. Two are external (world and devil) the other is internal (flesh). All three sources have two things in common – they all oppose God, and they are all “loud” (they all influence us aggressively).

The “voice” of the World focuses you on the pursuit of external things to replace God in your life. The World steers you toward comfort, self-justification, religion, and conformity. The World is the system that wants to deny uniqueness and get you to embrace a Godless Eden.

The Flesh is the enemy within. Is our human nature that is the polar opposite of Godly thinking. The Flesh wants us to be comparative, which is the source of pride, fear, and evil.

The Devil is the demonic influence (“devil” is from the Greek “diabolos” which means “one who hurls thing at you”  In the Biblical context, it is translated as “Accuser”). The Devil’s goal is destruction in long term. The devil works in the opposite manner to God. The Devil is constantly hurling seductive/destructive thoughts at your Flesh (as opposed to the heart), which you must make the moment-by-moment choice to accept or reject. Whenever an evil, destructive thought enters you mind and you think “where did that come from?” It was probably the Devil.

But, when you get saved a fourth influence is added – the Holy Spirit, who Jesus promised would live in the hearts of believers! The influence of the Spirit is focused on growth and faith, through contrastive thinking. The voice of the Spirit is the most difficult to hear. The Spirit speaks in a quiet, still, small voice. If the world pulls at you, the flesh yells at you, and the devil jabs you; the Spirit gives you a gentle nudge.

But why does God, the most powerful force of them all, choose to be so subtle?

Because he wants us to choose him! He wants us to love him – and that takes effort! Unlike the other influences that bombard us constantly and consistently, we have to be intentional to hear from God. We have to actively seek Him and intentionally block out the other voices. We have to pursue God. He wants us to love him enough to sacrifice our comforts, our lusts, and our natural desire to prosper without him.

Why?

1. Its a reasonable response to the sacrifice of redemption. Salvation is offered freely, but it wasn’t free. Jesus paid the price, and to live the redemptive life justly requires effort on our part.

2. The meaning of life requires it! Remember, the meaning of life is marriage. Jesus didn’t just come to save mankind, he came to redeem a bride! And he naturally wants a bride who wants Him and loves Him enough to be conformed to His image. His bride must be like Him – always and completely right and just.

And that’s the whole purpose of the 6th Dispensation, to find a bride for Christ!

This Bride consists of a group of people who are willing to accept His redemption, and intentionally and consistently allow themselves to be conformed to His image by heeding the voice of grace and be transformed into unique individuals who flourish in their individual greatness, adding the value of that greatness to the overall body of believers, thus creating a Bride worthy of God’s Son.

(Grace is personal, the guidance given to each person while always and completely right and just, also guides them to be the royal image bearer that was lost when Adam fell.)

This group of believers who are to be the Bride is called “the Church”.

If the 6th Dispensation were to be a success, the Church would be completely sanctified and conformed to Christ by obeying the voice of the Spirit completely.

However, logically, we know that this dispensation will fail like all the rest. But since we’re still in it, we don’t have the benefit of history to tell us exactly how and when it will end as we had with the other dispensations.

However we have enough knowledge of the dispensational pattern to take a theoretical stab at it. If success is tied to the Church hearing and obeying God’s voice, then failure would be the opposite -to ignore His voice.

But it has to be more than that. Dispensational failure means choosing ourselves over God. So then, in line with that pattern, this dispensation will fail when the Church chooses to be guided by ITS OWN voice instead of God’s!

I’ll address HOW this can happen in an upcoming post. As to WHEN this failure happens. . . I would contend that it ALREADY HAS!

Obviously that is a VERY provocative position that I’ll need to back up, and I will do that in an upcoming post as well.

But before we go there, we need to take a deeper look at this unique and mysterious entity called the Church. What is it? What are its origins? What is its purpose? Why does Jesus consider it his Bride? And what has it been doing the last 2000 years? We begin examining these questions next time.

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

November 2, 2014

The Jesus Myth – Part 3: Mission and Message

Posted in Government, Jesus, Salvation, Terminology at 1:34 PM by E. M.

NOT EVEN CLOSE

NOT EVEN CLOSE

In the last few posts, we’ve been looking at the myths created and/or promoted by Satan and the Mystics in order to lead people away from salvation. But how do they succeed and misrepresenting someone who known or acknowledged by most of the worlds population? You’d think the fact that Jesus is such publicly known figure would make this difficult, but its actually just the opposite.

The problem with being a familiar icon in culture is that people take for granted that they know the truth about Jesus as opposed to actually seeking out the truth. This – along with comparative thinking and man’s desire to make God in to his image instead of being conformed to God’s desire, allows Satan and the mystics to use deception to alter, de-emphasize, or eliminate the true message and mission of Jesus.

Let’s look at some of the more popular myths about Jesus’ mission and message.

Jesus came to preach Love and tolerance

Love is the chief attribute ascribed to Jesus, not only by believers, but by secularists and mystics. While believers look at Christ’s redemptive work as the exemplar of His love, the secular world uses the “love” of Jesus to promote the idea that He is universally tolerant and accepting of anything and everything we do.

The problem is that Jesus (and the Bible) do not use “love” as the ill-defined, ambiguous set of emotions and urges that constitute the popular modern notion of the word. Jesus never espoused this kind of love. Biblical love is about commitment and sacrifice – an act of the will, not a feeling. The command to love your enemy (one of the most mis-applied of Jesus’ teachings) () would be contradictory if love was a feeling or emotion. You cannot manufacture an emotion. Emotion is a reaction to stimuli. It is the effect of a cause. The law of cause and effect states that an effect cannot be independently created and Jesus cannot command us to do the impossible. Thus loving your enemy can only be an act initiated by your will.

As far as Jesus being the epitome of tolerance and acceptance – I’m afraid that is total fabrication. A widely pervasive fabrication, but a fabrication none the less. Jesus didn’t say we could enter heaven by being “just the way we are”. He said we have to be perfect! (which we can’t manage on our own, hence the need for a Redeemer). He doesn’t say “a little sin is ok”. He said to stop sinning period. He said that getting into Heaven is going to be difficult and that most of us won’t make it! And (brace yourself) He gave a clear definition of marriage. If Jesus walked the earth today, He’d be ostracized as an intolerant extremist!

He came to teach morality and enlighten all men

Many people want to see Jesus as some kind of cosmic guru who came down to give man instructions on how to live an optimal life. And while that idea is promoted by secular and religious mystics alike, it doesn’t match reality. As we see above (and in the last post), many Jesus’ teachings were inflammatory, difficult, and divisive. Furthermore, there was a point in His ministry after which Jesus deliberately concealed His message from the masses!

Despite the common thinking that Jesus used parables to make His message easier to understand, in truth, the opposite was true! He used parables so that only the chosen few would understand Him.

He came to preach “social justice”.

“Social Justice” is the latest marketing term used by the mystics who want to put a positive spin on their long term goal of decreasing individuality by taking what you’ve earned and giving it to someone who has not earned it (thus making sure everyone is equally poor). They try to make Jesus their spokesperson by using His advocacy to help the less fortunes as proof He was some kind of Social Justice revolutionary (like a first century Che Guevara).

This claim has no real Biblical support  Jesus does speak about the merits of voluntarily giving to the poor, but He never said or implied that the Government should forcibly take from some and give to others in order to create “equality”. Furthermore, there is no record of Jesus ever taking anyone out of poverty during His time on earth.  Moreover, He stated that the poverty would always be prevalent in this age.

In spite of efforts to the contrary, an honest look at Jesus words and deeds show that his mission was clear – He came to fulfill the law, to redeem man, and…to bring forth the Kingdom of God on earth (more on that in a moment).

Jesus stayed “on mission” during His entire ministry and constantly reiterated it to all who would listen. The world resists looking at His mission holistically because of the parts that they find offensive . Instead they pick out their favorite personal characteristics of Jesus or their favorite euphemisms regarding Him and try to make those things His mission. But an truthful and contextual examination of the scriptures does not allow that.

I brought up the idea of the “Kingdom of God on earth” above. That is a part of Jesus’ mission that I didn’t address before because:

  1. It didn’t happen during the 5th dispensation due to the Jews rejection of their Christ.
  2. I plan to detail it much more when we get to the 7th dispensation.

However, in the next post, we will wrap up our examination of the 5th Dispensation with a “tease” of the Kingdom by looking at what would have happened if the Jews didn’t reject their Messiah 2000 years ago…

October 25, 2013

The Law Myth – part 3: Grumpy Old God

Posted in Religion, Terminology, The Dispensations, The Law tagged , , , , , at 2:57 PM by E. M.

NOT AN ACCURATE REPRESENTATION OF GOD

NOT AN ACCURATE REPRESENTATION OF GOD

We’ve been looking at some of the myths about the Law and the 5th Dispensation.  In this final post on the subject we’ll discuss a set of myths that are both pervasive and controversial – the idea that God’s Law is meant to make us feel bad about stuff that makes us feel good.

The myth is that God is a cosmic kill joy who gets perverse pleasure out of telling us “Thou shall not…”    And the perception is that all the stuff God doesn’t want us to do are things we find enjoyable.  It’s almost like He set us up to fail by telling us not to do things we are naturally inclined to do.  But is this true?

We’ve seen over the last two posts that the rules of the Law are not meant to be repressive or religious.   But they actually have positive intentions – namely helping prepare the world for the advent of the Redeemer.

So where does this myth come from?  Frankly, much of it is self-serving.  Because of our nature and our tendency toward pride, we tend to desire things that are evil.  Evil leads to destruction.  God is not being repressive; He’s trying to protect us from destruction by identifying our evil tendencies and steering us away from them.

But since we don’t like anyone telling us that we are wrong, it’s easier to cast God in a negative light than admit that we like being evil.

The myth is also acerbated by religion. Mystics heap up additional religious laws on men in order to stifle uniqueness and retain their power.  But these superfluous rules aren’t from God.  Worse, since people ascribe them to God (because they believe the mystics who claim to speak for Him), they begin to believe that in order to follow God they have to be in constant compliance with innumerable arbitrary rules.

Sometimes well intentioned non-mystics are guilty of this too.  Ever hear your grandmother say things like “cleanliness is next to Godliness”, or “God helps those who help themselves”, or “an idle mind is the devils workshop”?   Being tidy, self-reliant, and focused are nice attributes, but these rules didn’t come from God, and ascribing His name to them doesn’t make them Biblical.

But let’s focus on the area that has been the biggest source of the “God is a big ol’ prude” myth – Sexuality.  The myth is, that generally speaking, God doesn’t like it when we have sex.  It’s a low, dirty desire that we mammals are cursed with and He’d just as soon we not even speak of it.  It should only be done for the express purpose of procreation.  And even then, it should only be done in a locked room.

In the dark.

Missionary style.

Completed as quickly and quietly as possibly.

And we should bath ourselves in bleach afterwards.

Honestly, the source of this myth is rooted in the very detailed sexual morality rules of the Law.  Its clear that God only approves of sex in the marital relationship.  BUT within the confines of marriage, sex is encouraged.

Sadly, well-intentioned (and some not so well-intentioned) people made the myth that “God hates sex” even more pervasive by going overboard in enforcing sexual morality and vilifying the sex act in any form.

So if this is a myth, how does God really feel about sex?  I would contend that God thinks sex is pretty damn awesome!  Why? Well, first of all He created it!  He created it to feel good to us!  And He created us to desire it!

After God created the first man and woman, He told them to “be fruitful and multiply”.  He commanded them to have sex!  He basically said “Adam, here’s your wife.  Eve, here’s your husband.  Now go get some!”

Moreover, the fact that the Song of Songs in even in the Bible proves that God delights in the joy of our sexuality.  The entire book is about a bride and groom who physically desire one another and delight in sex.  Here’s a snippet of the grooms description of his bride’s body.

How beautiful are your feet in sandals,
O prince’s daughter!
The curves of your thighs are like jewels,
The work of the hands of a skillful workman.
Your navel is a rounded goblet;
It lacks no blended beverage.
Your waist is a heap of wheat
Set about with lilies. Songs of songs 7: 1-2

To get the full impact of this passage, it’s worth mentioning here that the word “navel” is mistranslated due to the desire of the translators to be polite.  Notice that he’s working his way UP her body in the description.  There is an, ahem, “opening” on the female body between the thighs and the waist. . . but it ain’t her navel.  I’ll just leave it at that.

But if God thinks sex is so awesome, why are we only allowed to do it with the person we’re married to, and them alone?  That’s actually not a valid question.  God doesn’t see sex and marriage separately. The “marriage ceremony” we do today is a man-made tradition.  To God, sex isn’t something you do with the person you’re married to.  The sex act is what makes you married!

Technically there is no such thing as “sex before marriage” because sex IS marriage.  The act of sex is the consummation of the marriage covenant.  So technically, in God’s eyes, you married the first person you had sex with (I’ll give you a moment to recover from the horror).  And you are committing adultery with any person you have sex with subsequently.  So you see why God wants us to take sex seriously?

God is strict about sex because of the tremendous value he places on marriage and what it symbolizes.  The joy and ecstasy of sex is God’s earthly representation of what Heaven is going to be like!  Kind of makes you anxious to get there, doesn’t it?

And as mentioned above, the rules of the Law are God’s way of protecting us from ourselves.  Again our tendency is toward evil so we have strong desires to be sexually immoral.  But the consequences of that immorality is destructive.

Promiscuity, infidelity, and adultery are emotionally devastating.  They break hearts, break up families, and ruin childhoods.  Sexual immorality can also lead to physical damage (disease) and physical dependency – the neurochemicals released during sex are identical to the ones released when addictive drugs are used.  God intended this function to bond you physically and emotionally to your spouse.  But illicit sex leaves you empty and constantly in search of your next “fix”, be it at the local bar or in front of a computer screen.

Lastly, let’s tackle the big controversy (at least in the eyes of contemporary society) – homosexuality.  I’m not going to sugarcoat the subject, because God doesn’t.  God calls it an abomination.  It’s listed as one of the effects of intentionally disregarding God and our inherent knowledge of Him.  Is this because God “hates” homosexuals as some zealots proclaim?

No, it goes back to how important marriage is to God, and how He defines it.  God defines marriage as the sexual covenant between a man and a woman.  Period.  And He considers anyone or anything that intentionally perverts that definition an affront to Him.  I know that’s not politically correct, but I kind of doubt God is terribly concerned about popular opinion.  The question is, should God conform to the whims of His creation, or should His creation conform to Him?

I won’t argue with someone who says they were born with a desire for someone of the same sex, any more than I would argue with someone who says they were born with a bad temper, or a predisposition to substance abuse, or even a desire for heterosexual promiscuity.   The issue is not the desire.  It’s what you choose to do with that desire.  We are creatures with free will – AND the responsibility that goes along with it.

The bottom line is that homosexuality is a sin in God’s eyes – like every other sin we all commit.  It has the same source, the same consequences, and the same remedy.  Presenting it as anything more or less than that is misrepresenting God.

Now that we’ve addressed some of the major myths of the Law, it’s time to focus on the major outcome of the Law – the advent of the Redeemer.  Considering the extraordinary and eternal impact of the event, it’s safe to say that the Redemption of man is the most important even in our history.  Understandably, this advent is the most well described event in the bible.  In fact, much of this description was detailed hundreds of years before He even arrived!  We’ll begin to explore all this next time.

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

August 7, 2013

The Law Myth – part 1: Generous Oppression

Posted in Religion, Terminology, The Dispensations, The Law tagged , , , , , , , at 12:24 PM by E. M.

A mild over-reaction to the Law

A mild over-reaction to the Law

In the 5th Dispensation, God gave His nation, Israel a volume of commands and instructions collectively called the Law.  The particulars of the Law are very detailed and specific, and Israel’s compliance with them was non-negotiable (they were commands after all).  The Israelites were promised great blessings and prosperity if they obeyed the Law, and severe punishment if they disobeyed.

In the last post we saw that one of the purposes of the Law was to help men understand God’s standards of righteousness and what constitutes sin.  And while there is much in the Law regarding morality, there are also detailed rules on things like personal conduct, property rights, ceremonial procedures, worship instructions, food safely, litigation, hygiene, and medicine.

Many of the commandments of the Law can sound pretty strange and overly restrictive to modern ears, and when filtered through contemporary agnostic perspectives, can lead to misunderstandings about the nature and purpose of the Law.  In this post, I want to address some of the myths that arise from these misunderstandings.

A few years ago, I was having a discussion with an atheist friend about God and the Bible (its funny how atheists claim they don’t believe in God, yet they always want to talk about Him.  I don’t believe in Santa Claus yet I almost never bring him up in casual conversation).

Anyway, as with most discussions I have with atheists, her point was not to gain knowledge, but rather to point out something so illogical or abhorrent about God that it would justify her decision not to believe in Him.  In this case, the discussion veered toward the Law and how “oppressive” it was to women and how it advocated slavery (therefore I must be crazy to believe in God because He’s such an a-hole).

At best, this argument showed that like most atheists, she had barely more than a superficial understanding of the Bible, and was so quick to let her shallow perceptions color her beliefs that she failed to do the due diligence required to truly understand the subject matter (sadly, this is a trait that many Christians share, which is why they have trouble handling these arguments).

Although the Law does have commandments that specifically address women, they are hardly oppressive.  In fact, the Law was revolutionary in the fact that it guaranteed women certain rights that were unheard of in that part of the world during that time.  The Law gave women rights in a divorce, it mandated special care for widows, and allowed women to own land, and it gave women the right to inherit land and property (all without any input from Gloria Steinem).

As for “slavery”, the issue is a matter of contemporary nomenclature.  The slavery mentioned in the Law is not chattel slavery as we think of it today, rather its more like indentured servitude.  For example, if you owed a man a debt that you couldn’t pay, under the Law, you would work for that man and your wages would incrementally relieve the debt.  Once the debt was paid, you’d go free (incidentally, this is the same arrangement you have with your credit card company).

There are many other so called “oppressive” aspects of the Law which, while unprecedented during the era, would be simply considered common sense today.  Under the Law, certain animals are considered “clean” and “unclean”.  This is based on which animals are most likely to carry and cause disease.  God was trying to keep the Israelites healthy, not be a diet Nazi.

People with certain diseases like leprosy or open wounds were considered “unclean”.  The Law requires that they be separated from heath society and sanitized – things that are considered standard procedure for quarantine of communicable diseases and infection treatment to this day.  So if the Law is oppressive, then so is your doctor!

Of course this is all well and good, but all this still begs the question, why did God give the Israelites all these rules as a part of the 5th Dispensation?  If the purpose of the 5th Dispensation is to usher in the advent of the Redeemer, what does Israel get for all their troubles?

Rewards!  If they follow the commandments of the Law, Israel was promised fantastic material prosperity!  Prosperity that would make them the envy of all the other nations in the world.

But again, what does this have to do with the purpose of the 5th Dispensation.  It’s all about Israel’s intended role as God’s ambassador nation.

Here how it was to work, God gave Israel the Law, which gave them the standards to follow that would make them a healthy, equitable, and civilized society.  The Law also gave them ceremonial rules that would memorialize the advent of the Redeemer in advance (more on that in the next post).  As Israel obeyed the Law, they would become wealthy and prosperous.

Other neighboring nations would see their prosperity and say, “hey, how’d you guys manage to get all that stuff?”  This would give Israel the opportunity to tell them about God, the Law, and the Redeemer.

If the neighboring nations submitted to the Law, they too would become prosperous, leading their neighbors to ask about their wealth.  Submission to God’s Law would grow exponentially, and by the time of the advent of the Redeemer, the entire world would be ready for Him, and God could quickly implement His plan.

But there was also a flip side.  You see, God had to set things up so that if Israel disobeyed God’s Law and acted unrighteous and unjustly, they would be cursed as spectacularly as they would have been blessed for obedience.

The reason for the harshness of the curse is they same as the reasoning for the great blessing – They were God’s acknowledged representatives on earth.

If other nations saw Israel acting immorally without any consequence, they would assume that God was ok with their evil behavior.  So God had to punish disobedience severely so that the nations would know that evil was not acceptable to Him.

Sadly, Israel chose the path of disobedience to the Law more often than not.  Thus much of the details of the 5th Dispensation in the Old Testament consists of the sad narrative pattern of Israel screwing up, God punishing them, Israel repenting, God restoring them, and then Israel going right back to screwing up.  Ultimately resulting in the tragic screw-up where they failed to acknowledge the Redeemer and failed the dispensation.

I mentioned before that in addition to the rules regarding health and conduct, the Law contained many commandments that were sacramental in nature – dealing with blood sacrifices, the priesthood, etc.  These rules are often confused for religion, because frankly, they look like religion.  But they actually served a very practical purpose in preparing people for the advent of the Redeemer.  More on this next time.

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

March 29, 2011

Faith part 4: Fear Factor

Posted in Faith, Terminology tagged , , , , , at 7:36 AM by E. M.

In the last few posts, we have been examining faith. Generally speaking, faith is the willingness to rely on something that we do not have full knowledge of.

Biblically speaking, faith is the expectation of something good, from a source or object that is not fully known, based on some previously validated knowledge and/or experience with the source

There is another “faith based” reaction to that which is not fully known.  There are circumstances where we react to what we do not know with some level of trepidation instead of hope.  This reaction is called “fear”.

Like faith, fear can be reasonable or irrational depending on whether or not it is based on knowledge and/or experience.

It is reasonable and sensible to be afraid if you are walking in a high crime area, being tailgated by a teenage driver, or swimming in shark infested waters.  Why?  Because we have knowledge (or experience) that crimes tend to happen in high crime areas, teenagers are clinically insane, and sharks tend to bite the living  $#!&% out of people whenever they get the opportunity.

Reasonable fear can be defined as the rational mindfulness of something that has the power to affect us.  Another word that can be used as a definition of reasonable fear is “respect”

The type of fear that will be the focus of this post is irrational fear – Fear that is not based on knowledge and experience – fear of the unknown.

Irrational fear is that general, undefined dread that people often feel without any logical reason.  This fear is so common that it has become a major aspect of clinical psychology where it is known as “anxiety”.  It can manifest as anything from simple anxiousness, and obsessive-compulsive activity, to debilitating panic attacks.

This type of fear is actually the antithesis of Biblical faith.  Biblical faith is the expectation of something positive based on knowledge.  Fear is the expectation of something negative based on the unknown.

In the Bible we are told to “fear God”.  It doesn’t mean we are to quake before Him in primitive dread of His arbitrary whim.  It means we should demonstrate a rational respectfulness based on our knowledge of His power and His nature.

There are nearly 200 admonitions in the Bible that we not be fearful or anxious.  Those admonitions generally refer to fear that is not based on knowledge.   For example, just about every time people witness the appearance of a supernatural being in the Bible, there first reaction is to be paralyzed with fear (or worse) because they don’t understand what they are seeing.  At this point, the being quickly tells them not to be afraid, and then gives them knowledge to help them understand.

Why is admonition against irrational fear so prominent in the Bible?

If you have no knowledge of a situation that is causing you fear, then you have a choice to be comparative or contrastive.   The contrastive choice is to either cognitively acknowledge that it is pointless to fear the unknown, or rely on a source that has some level of knowledge of the unknown thing you fear.  The comparative choice is to rely on yourself to deal with the unknown situation; but since you have no practical knowledge, you will either become paralyzed by the fear or you will take destructive (evil) actions.

The Bible does offer a remedy to fear – that remedy is love!

“There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment. But he who fears has not been made perfect in love.” – 1 John 4:18

How does love remedy fear?  Remember we defined love in an earlier post as the willingness to give without expectation of getting anything in return.

The common theme in love and fear is “expectation” – fear expects something negative.  Love expects nothing.

Therefore, if you are focused on love (no expectations) then you can’t have negative expectations – you can’t love and fear at the same time!

We will conclude our discussion of faith by focusing on the cognitive process that acts as the gateway to faith and fear.  Next time, we will examine  “belief”.

November 12, 2010

Does God Need Evil?

Posted in Terminology tagged , , , , , at 6:48 PM by E. M.

MANUTE BOL - THE GREATEST WARRIOR

Last week we continued our examination of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil by defining “good” as that “that which creates in the long term”, and “evil” as “that which destroys in the long term”.

The concepts of Good and evil are prominent themes in the Bible and drive much of the Biblical narrative.

The overarching theme of the Bible is the redemption of man.  The redemption scenario begins with Original Sin and the Fall of Man in Genesis, and concludes with the restoration of Heaven and Earth, and the implementation of God’s plan at the end of the dispensations.

Redemption is only possible if evil occurs first.  So does God need evil in order to make His plan possible?  Did He have to somehow “stack the deck” against Adam and Eve in order to make Original Sin happen?  Does good need evil in order to exist?

The answer to these questions is “no”.   Adam and Eve did not have to listen to the serpent in the Garden of Eden.  They could have chosen to obey God and take moment-by-moment direction from Him forever (more on this in the next post).  Then the first dispensation would have been a success and God could have implemented His plan.

But God knew that Adam and Eve would sin, not because of any manipulation on His part, but because He knew the causes and the effects.  God knew that a being who’s nature was not always and completely right and just (man) would eventually make a wrong (sinful) decision.  But God had to give Adam and Eve an honest choice because God is just, and His ultimate goal is for man to choose to love Him.

So God did not need evil, but He knew the causes would lead to evil effects so He had a plan of redemption on standby from the beginning.

Good does not need evil in order to exist.  In fact, it’s the other way around – evil needs good in order to exist!

Good is creation.  Evil is destruction.  In order to create something, it’s not necessary that something else be destroyed first.  Creation can occur forever without any destruction occurring (in fact, that’s what Heaven is all about).  So good does not need evil.

On the other hand, the only way you can destroy something is if that “something” has already been created.  It is possible to create something out of nothing, but you can’t destroy “nothing”.  Evil cannot exist on its own.  Evil needs “good” to create something for it to destroy.  Evil needs good in order to exist.

With this in mind, I would contend that one of the most effective ways to defeat evil is to not give it anything to destroy.  I will give you a benign example of this idea in action.

I grew up in Los Angeles.  My parents were huge fans of the LA Lakers basketball team, so I’ve rooted for them all my life.  A few years ago I had a co-worker who was a huge fan of the Golden State Warriors (I know, I didn’t think such a creature existed either).  His love for the warriors was matched only by his hatred for the Lakers.

Once he found out that I was a Lakers fan, he took every opportunity to pump up the warriors and denigrate the Lakers.  His goal was “evil”.  He wanted to destroy the portion of  Lakers fandom that I embodied.

For those of you who don’t know, in the entire history of the two sports franchises, the Warriors have never come close to the stature of the Lakers.  They are more of a nuisance than a threat.  Yet this co-worker always managed to frustrate me with the illogical conversations he would engage me in.  Here is a sample:

Warriors Fan: Warriors are going all the way this year!

Me:  you mean all the way to last place like last year?

Warriors Fan: Warriors are a better franchise than the Lakers!  That’s a fact!

Me: you’re as crazy as a bag of squirrels.  That’s a fact.  The Lakers have always been superior to the Warriors

Warriors Fan:  In 1988 the Warriors led the league in points

Me:  Yet the Lakers won the championship that year

Warriors Fan: That’s because the ref’s gave Magic Johnson all the calls!  He’s not even that good.

Me:  He won 5 championships and 3 league MVP’s

Warriors Fan: but he wasn’t as exciting as Michael Jordan!

Me: What does Jordan have to do with anything?

Warriors Fan: Warriors could have traded for Michael Jordan in 1986

Me:  Traded for him with what?  Manute Bol and a ham sandwich?  That’s all the Warriors had in ‘86

Warriors Fan: With Jordan, we would have won 6 titles!

Me: You need serious mental help

Warriors Fan: Kobe Bryant is the one who needs help!  He’s the most hated player in the league. . .

See the pattern?  He would always succeed in frustrating me because I kept trying to defeat him with facts and logic.  But he never had to create any logical facts because his goal was to destroy; so all he had to do was keep throwing silly arguments at me until I gave up, and he’d get the last word.

I decided to try an experiment and see how our conversation would go if I didn’t give him anything to destroy:

Warriors Fan: Warriors are going to kick some Lakers butt tonight!

Me:  That’s certainly a possibility

Warriors Fan: Nobody likes Kobe, not even his own teammates

Me: That may be

Warriors Fan:  . . . Lakers defense is terrible this year

Me: Nobody’s perfect

Warriors Fan: . . .yeah . . . well . . .Lakers suck.  I’m going to my desk now

Me:  Make sure you adjust your chair for maximum ergonomic efficiency.

He needed me to create arguments for him.  Without them, he had nothing to destroy.  When I withheld my “good” from him, his “evil” quickly burned itself out.

Again, this was an innocuous example, but you can see this idea carried out in some of the encounters Jesus had with His detractors, Matthew 22:15-46 is a good sample.  The stated goal of His enemy was to trap Him verbally in order to destroy His popularity with the people and illegitimatize His authority.  Notice that Jesus did not create anything new for them, He would respond by either quote existing scripture, or by asking them questions to expose their motives.

As a productive exercise, I recommend that the next time someone tries to engage you in a conversation or activity with the intent of destruction, see what happens when you withhold whatever it is they need you to create in order to feed their desire for evil.  Depending on the person and the conversation, it can actually be quite fun.

In the next post, we will bring together everything we’ve learned so far about the first dispensation and examine exactly how and why eating of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil led to death.

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

October 31, 2010

A Tale of Two Trees part 4 – Evil is as Evil Does

Posted in Terminology tagged , , , , , at 8:45 PM by E. M.

THE GATEWAY TO EVIL (AND CHLAMYDIA)

In order to understand why eating fruit from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil would lead to death for Adam and Eve we have to first gain an objective understanding of what “good” and “evil” are.

In the last post, we examined the Biblical definition of “good”.  In this post, we will address “evil”.

In the last post we saw that “good” is “that which creates”.  However we also saw that sometimes circumstances call for short term destruction in order for there to be long-term creation.  So the complete definition of “good” is the idea of “that which creates in the long-term

Biblically speaking, evil is presented as the opposite of good.  So “evil” would then obviously be defined as “that which destroys in the long term”.

When we are tempted to do evil, we are tempted to do something that will (or that we think will) be good; that will create something for us (pleasure, happiness, satisfaction, reward, etc.).  But it only creates in the short term, and the long-term results are destruction.

There are many obvious examples of this – drug and alcohol abuse, reckless driving, lying, cheating, theft, sex with Kim Kardashian (boy, do I regret that now.  Thank God for penicillin).

We also saw in the last post that the ultimate expression of “good” is eternal life – perpetual creation.  Conversely, the ultimate expression of “evil” would be eternal death – perpetual irreparable destruction.  Hell.

The key to determining whether something is good or evil is to look at the long-term intent and results.  For example, saving your money is good because the long-term results are the ability to buy a home, send your kids to college, and enjoy a secure retirement.  But in the short term, it means the sacrifice of certain pleasures.  On the other hand, if you spend all your money as soon as you get it, you can have a great time in the short term, but the long-term results are a future of poverty and debt.

Understanding long-term vs. short-term is also a key to understanding God’s actions in the Bible, in the world, and in our lives.  God is good.  He creates in the long term.  His focus is not on our short-term happiness; His focus is our long term good.  The ultimate long-term good is eternal life.  And if God has to introduce or allow short-term pain, discomfort, distress and frustration into our lives in order to drive us toward accepting and embracing the things that will lead us to eternal life, then that is what He will do.

When persistent and/or unusual calamities occur in our lives, instead of complaining and questioning God’s goodness, it would probably be more beneficial to ask, “God, what are trying to drive me towards and how will it work for my long-term good?”  That, my friends is contrastive thinking!

Contrastive thinking can lead to eternal life, which again, is the ultimate expression of “good”.  Therefore, we can say that contrastive thinking is good.  Comparative thinking prevents repair and can lead to perpetual death.  Therefore, we can say that comparative thinking is evil.

So how can you tell if a person is good or evil?  Actually, you can’t.  None of us has enough comprehensive information about another person to categorically declare their entire being good or evil.

This is the rationale behind one of the most misquoted verses in the Bible – The admonition not to judge in Matthew 7:1.  This verse is often used by a guilty person as their defense when you confront them about their wrongdoings.  (Have you ever heard an innocent person tell you not to judge them?)  Instead of owning up to their guilt, they try to sidestep it by attacking your right to accuse them.  But we are told later in the same chapter of Mathew that we can and should judge what a person does (Matthew 7:15-20).

So while we cannot judge whether a person, is good or evil, we can judge if they are pursuing good or evil.  How?  Examine the long-term intent and results of their actions.  Is the focus of their life the pursuit of creation or destruction?  Do their actions lead to repair, and life, or do they lead to stagnation, and destruction?  Are they motivated by the desire to grow, even if it causes them discomfort and pain, or do they actively justify themselves in order to avoid pain?  When they are wrong, do they think comparatively or contrastively?

What a person pursues in the long-term is the key to understanding their life.  Furthermore, examining you own life and looking at what you are pursuing in the long-term can allow you to see if you are headed toward life or death.

Now that we understand good and evil, we are ready to examine the ramifications of Adam and Eve eating from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  But before we do, there is one more question that needs to be addressed.  God’s plan of redemption (the Fall of Man, the incarnation of Christ, the cross and the Resurrection) all seem predicated on the existence of evil.  So, does God need evil in order to bring about His plan? Does good need evil in order to exist? Next time.

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

October 26, 2010

A Tale of Two Trees part 3 – The Greater Good

Posted in Terminology tagged , , , , , at 9:42 PM by E. M.

ONE OF THE GREAT INTELLECTUALS OF OUR TIME

There were two trees in the Eden narrative.  We’ve looked at the Tree of Life in the last two posts, now we need to examine the other, more infamous tree – the Tree of the Knowledge of God and Evil.  Eating the fruit of that tree led to Original Sin, and death.

Why would gaining knowledge of good and evil result in death for Adam and Eve?  In order to answer that, we need to understand what “good” and “evil” are.  In this post, we will define “good”.

Like “love”, good and evil are highly subjective terms.  Adolf Hitler, a universal archetype of evil actually thought that his actions were good for the German people.  There was a time in the history of this country wherein many people thought it was evil to free slaves and allow them human rights.  Then there are those who contend that the only “good” is the belief that no one can know what is good, and the only evil is the belief that evil exists.  Traditionally, these people had been known as “illogical, dope-smoking, hippie morons”.  Today they are called “intellectuals”.

Fortunately, we know that absolutes exist, which means that there are absolute standards for good and evil.  Those absolutes could only be set by someone who has all the information in existence.  As we have seen, that “someone” is the First Cause of existence, whom we call God.

So how does God define good and evil?

When using the Bible to define terminology, it can be helpful to use something that theologians call “the law of first mention”.  It basically contends that there is usually great significance in the first time a term is mentioned in the Bible.   The first time that “good” is used in the Bible is Genesis 1:3-4

Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good; and God divided the light from the darkness.

In fact, the first seven times the word “good” is used in the Bible is in the creation narrative of Genesis 1.  With that in mind, I would postulate that good should be strongly associated with creation, and the working Biblical definition of “good” is “that which creates”.

God is described throughout the Bible as “good”, which means “God creates”.  This of course fits with Genesis 1.

However if we leave the definition at that, it creates a problem (no pun intended).  The opposite of creation is destruction.  Yet the Bible often shows that God destroys.  In Genesis 6, God destroyed the world with a flood.  Throughout the Old Testament God destroys the enemies of Israel.  The Bible is also filled with prophesies of God destroying the world completely at the end of the dispensations.

We know that contradictions do not exist.  So how can God be “good” if He also destroys?

Well, lets look at the long-term results of the destructions I just mentioned.  The Flood of Noah destroyed all the unrepentant evil in the world and allowed man a fresh start.  The destruction of Israel’s enemies resulted in the continuation of the Jewish race and the eventual birth of Christ.  The destruction of the world at the end of the dispensations will usher in a new world completely devoid of evil.

So it seems that the short-term destruction that God caused was necessary in order to create favorable situations in the long-term.

With this understanding, the definition of “good” is the idea of “that which creates in the long-term”.  Good can include short-term destruction if that destruction is necessary for long-term creation.

An interesting exercise would be to go through the Bible and substitute the idea of “that which creates in the long term” everywhere you find the word “good”.  I think you will see that it fits pretty consistently.

The ultimate expression of good would be something that perpetually creates in the long-term.  We are actually quite familiar with an example of a system that was designed to perpetually create.  The cells of our bodies constantly reproduce and repair.  We call this system life.  Life perpetually creates.  Life is not only “good”, eternal life it is the ultimate expression of good.  Jesus summarizes this idea in John 12:24-25.

Most assuredly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the ground and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it produces much grain. He who loves his life will lose it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life.

Next time we will examine the Biblical meaning of “evil”.

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

September 20, 2010

A Tale of Two Trees part 2 – Death

Posted in Terminology tagged , , , , at 8:08 PM by E. M.

NOT EVERYONE'S IDEA OF HEAVEN

There were two trees in the Eden narrative – the Tree of life, and the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  One sustained life, the other brought death.  In the last post, we saw that life is the ability to repair physically and spiritually.  Physical life is in the blood, and spiritual life is in words.  The right nutrients in blood can repair physical damage, and the right information in words can spiritual damage.  The right information (expressed in words) that can repair and lead to spiritual life, are words of repentance.  Repentance begins with contrastive thinking.

With the right blood, and the right thinking, you could repair forever and have eternal life.

If life is the ability to repair, then obviously “death” is the inability to repair.

Since death did not exist before Adam and Eve ate from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, it is logical to assume that they were initially immortal, or at least had the means to sustain their “alive” status without any cellular degradation (presumably by eating from the Tree of Life). But when they ate the forbidden fruit, something happened to disrupt this.

So what happened when they ate the fruit?  Their disobedience cut them off from righteousness (God) and instead of repenting and repairing, they chose to be comparative.  This comparative thinking lead to a form of brain damage that was passed on to their genetic offspring (us).  Thus, while Adam and Eve were created in the image of God, we are all born in the image of fallen Adam and Eve.

We’ve inherited their brain damage.  We are born without the connection to righteousness (God) that they had.  We are born self-centered instead of God-centered.  We are born with an innate capacity for comparative thinking.  We are born without an innate desire for contrastive thinking (Romans 3:10-12).  We are born without the ability for sustainable spiritual self-repair – we are born spiritually dead.

When Adam and Eve got the boot from the Garden of Eden, they also lost access to the Tree of Life (Genesis 3:22-24), so they lost the capacity for sustainable physical self-repair, and their bodies began to age and deteriorate toward physical death.  And their offspring suffer the same curse.

But this situation, while just, presents God with a problem.  A population of spiritually dead and physically dying people would make it impossible for God to get what He wants (spending eternity with the walking dead probably isn’t much fun – unless you’re Stephen King).  So God has to come up with a just way for dead and dying people to regain life.

How can the dead and dying regain life?  By being reborn.  In order to be reborn, we first have to die.

We will all die at least once.  Our physical bodies will one day die and decompose, but our spirit is different.  It cannot cease to exist because it is eternal.  However, as we just read, our spirit can be “dead” when it cannot repair.

Yet while we are born spiritually dead, we are born physically alive. We continue to grow and repair (non-lethal) damage until we peak in early adulthood, then we deteriorate and die physically.

If a physical rebirth were possible, it would have to happen after physical death.  but since we are born spiritually dead, we could conceivably experience spiritual rebirth while we are physically alive.  We could be spiritually “born again” even though our physical bodies are deteriorating.

How could this rebirth happen?  Through perfect thinking and perfect blood.  If we could gain access to perfect thinking and perfect blood, we could be reborn into spiritual life while we are still physically alive (though deteriorating), and regain sustainable physical life after our bodies die.

So if we could experience two births (Initial physical birth and spiritual rebirth) we would only die once (physical body).  However if you were to choose not to access the perfect thinking and perfect blood for whatever reason, then when your physical body dies, justice would demand that your spirit be put into a state in which it could not repair for eternity.  We’ll discuss this in a later post when we address “Hell”.

In a nutshell – if you’re born twice, you die once.  If you’re born once, you die twice.

It would seem then that a result of the first dispensation was the need for God to find a righteous and just way to give humanity access to perfect thinking and perfect blood so that those who chose to accept it could live for eternity.  This idea will prove to be the seed plot of our entire history.

Understanding life and death completes our look at the Tree of Life.  Now we need to take a look at the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  Why did gaining knowledge of good and evil lead to death for Adam and Eve?  In order to answer that, we need to understand what “good” and “evil” are.  Next time…

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

September 5, 2010

A Tale of Two Trees part 1 – Life

Posted in Terminology tagged , , , , , , at 11:35 AM by E. M.

Child Abuse In A Box

In the first dispensation, Adam and Eve were told that they should not eat of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  If they ate from that tree, the result (effect) of that action would be death.  While the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil gets most of the attention in the Eden narrative, its very important to remember that there was a second titular tree in the garden – The Tree of Life

And out of the ground the LORD God made every tree grow that is pleasant to the sight and good for food. The tree of life was also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. – Genesis 2:9

Adam and Eve were told that they could freely eat of all the trees except for the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil.  Presumable that would mean that the fruit of the Tree of Life was a part of the acceptable diet plan.  So eating of the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil would result in death, but eating from the Tree of Life would sustain life.

But what exactly is “Life”? – other than a rather bland breakfast cereal that my mother made me eat while cruelly ignoring my desire for Cap’n Crunch!  (Hmmm, looks like it my be time to visit my therapist again…)

From a purely scientific standpoint, an organism is considered “alive” if it has self-sustaining biological functionality; if it has the ability to ingest and metabolize nutrients, grow, respond to stimuli, reproduce, and adapt to its environment.  Organisms have many complex organs and systems that work in a synchronistic fashion  to accomplish this, but on a cellular level, the key to maintaining life is the ability of our cells to continually reproduce themselves.

As we’ve seen before, matter cannot be created or destroyed.  Technically, there is no scientific reason for death.  Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells.  As our cells wear down, an exact copy replaces them.  From birth until death, all of our cells constantly reproduce themselves.  Some do it every few hours, some take several days.  It actually takes about 28 days for every cell in your body to reproduce itself – so technically; you get a new body every month (unfortunately for some, it’s a copy of the same body they had before).

Our bodies are design for perpetual life.  With enough fuel from food, there is no reason why we should die . . .yet we do.  As we age our cells become less and less efficient at reproduction.  Genetic defects and disease impair the cells ability to repair damage.  When the cells of a vital organ like the heart, lungs, liver, or brain lose the ability to repair, the systems that rely on them to remain functional fail, and we die.

What is the difference between a dead body and a living one (other than the smell)?  The living body maintains the ability to repair damage to enough of a degree to maintain functionality.

Life is the ability to self-repair.  If you somehow had the ability to repair any damage that was done to you, you would live forever.

In biological terms, the Bible states that life is in the blood of an organism, and that blood sustains life (Leviticus 17:11, Leviticus 17:14 ).  This makes sense since blood transports the essential nutrients, building blocks, and organic information necessary for cells to reproduce, function, and repair.

But we know that we are not just physical beings.  We are also spirit. What does the Bible say about spiritual life?  Lets take a sneak peak into the 5th dispensation where Jesus speaks about life:

Then Jesus said to them, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you.  Whoever eats My flesh and drinks My blood has eternal life… – John 6:53-54

No, this is not an endorsement of cannibalism, He is speaking symbolically.  Keep reading.

It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh profits nothing. The words that I speak to you are spirit, and they are life. – John 6:63

Jesus was speaking metaphorically and using a revelatory pun by associating blood (physical life) with spiritual life.  So what leads to spiritual life?  Words!

This idea is in total agreement with what we learned about spirit in an earlier post on this blog. That post showed that the content of spirit is information, and words are the conduits of information.  Just as blood is the key to physical life because it is the transportation medium of the essence of physical life, words are the key to spiritual life because words are the transportation medium of information.

The verse states that words are life. Not just any words, but the words that constitute one of Christ’s primary messages on earth – repentance.  Words of repentance are the words that lead to life.

When they heard these things they became silent; and they glorified God, saying, “Then God has also granted to the Gentiles repentance to life.” – Acts 11:18

Repentance for our wrongs leads to spiritual life because repentance is the process of turning from our wrongs and embracing right.  Words of repentance cause us to repair spiritually!  And what precedes repentance?  Contrastive thinking!

So if we look at it from a cause/effect standpoint: contrastive thinking leads to repentance, which leads to repair, which leads to life.

So it all comes back to contrastive thinking.  Contrastive thinking leads to righteousness and life. And righteousness is what it takes to be like God and live eternally in Heaven.

Moreover, life is not a static quantity.  There are qualitative levels of life.  When we asked “What’s the Point?”, the problem we were addressing was really “living” versus just “being alive”.

The thief comes only in order to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance (to the full, till it overflows). – John 10:10 Amplified Bible

Jesus states that we can have more life; better life; an abundance of life.  This is not possible if life is just a binary measurement of being alive or not alive.  But it is possible if life is the ability to repair.  Having more and/or better life would mean the ability to repair physical and spiritual damage faster and more efficiently.  The ultimate or perfect life would be the ability to repair instantaneously.  This would constitute immortality, and eternal life.

Perfect blood would be the cause of eternal physical life, and perfect thinking would be the cause of eternal physical life.  But how could we get access to someone with perfect blood and perfect thinking?  That answer will have to wait until the 5th dispensation . . .

So if life is the ability to repair, what is death?  How did it come about, and what are the implications of spiritual death?  Death isn’t all bad.  It depends on which part of you dies . . . and how many times you die.  Stay tuned . . .

Remember to subscribe to this blog to receive new posts when they are published

Next page